Anonymous’ New Book – A Warning – Reveals Nothing More than His or Her Own Mercenary Cynicism

Alright Anonymous, supposing there is any truth at all to the assertion that democracy’s white knights were embedded in 2018, undetected, in a White House rife with paranoia and reactionary ignorance, what measurable good has your incognito resistance produced? May I remind you that nationally televised House of Representatives impeachment hearings begin this coming Wednesday evening? If a patriotic duty to remain in your post was required to prevent international violations of the Constitution like Trump’s Ukrainian quid pro quo, nice work Monkey Boy (or Girl).

Now comes late 2019 word that, just in time for the holiday season, Anonymous has published him or herself an entire book. Since this person’s only real concern is for the American people, I’m sure all proceeds are being donated to the Immigrant Defense Project, or another worthy non-profit that has extra full hands fighting injustice in the Trump era. We may never know this person’s name, but we shan’t doubt they toil on the right side of history. Why? Because they say so!”

Read the full post at Contemptor.

Hoodoo Love

(l to r) Martasia Jones and Shariba Rivers in ‘Hoodoo Love.’ (Photo: Michael Brosilow)

“Equal parts musical, mystical and pedantic, Hoodoo Love, as directed by Wardell Julius Clark, is a Depression-era, Tennessee prism through which an audience member can grow mesmerized by any refraction. The play ends as it begins, with Toulou (Martasia Jones) staring out toward the railroad tracks, guitar strapped to her back, ready to ‘catch that train’ in search of her soul-singing destiny. In between these identical scenes, there is labor, love, loss, friendship, hypocrisy and hope, all sprinkled with a little of the Hoodoo magic Toulou borrows from her neighbor, a widowed former slave and shawoman known as Candylady (Shariba Rivers).

The play’s second, lengthy, and impossibly sexy scene is a bedroom tussle between Toulou and her lover, a complex rolling stone of a music man named Ace of Spades (Matthew James Elam). To the sweaty credit of intimacy and violence designer Rachel Flesher, audiences may find themselves jonesing for a cigarette after the couple’s lovemaking is through. Set against the backdrop of a Deep South thunderstorm, these few minutes are excitingly erotic, without bawdiness, and establish an authentic foundation for understanding Toulou’s addiction.

While Toulou prides herself on resourceful independence, Ace’s artistic gifts behind the microphone (and between the sheets) spring the young woman into the sultry Memphis stratosphere. With the passionate impatience of the smitten, Toulou engages the “good” magical services of Candylady to make her Ace of Spades think about staying a while. The women’s best intentions inadvertently touch off a sequence of disastrous events beyond antidote, reinforcing the play’s central ideological argument. Circumstances may be manipulated, but love and human nature are inherently immutable, answerable only to their own animal instincts.”

Read the full review on The Broadway Blog.

You Are Happy

(l to r) Brendan Connelly, Michelle Mary Schaefer, Sara JK Shoemaker and Emily Turner in ‘You Are Happy.’ (Photo: Matthew Freer)

“Déraspe owes a tremendous ideological debt to the Existentialist school of thought, a philosophy to which she contributes her own perspective. The script develops Jean Paul-Sartre’s famous conclusion that ‘Hell is other people,’ extending the paradigm to include the self. After all, ‘I’ am still a person capable of rendering my world a psychological hellscape. The script asks audiences to consider the satisfying and painful aspects of both solitude and partnership, without offering a definitive value judgment of either state.

You Are Happy presents theatergoers with the small, quirky story of career woman and committed singleton, Bridget (Emily Turner – ASL, Elana Weiner-Kaplow – Voice). Bridget is the vigilant caretaker of her brother, Jeremy (Brendan Connelly – ASL, Bowie Foote – Voice), a suicidally depressed young man yearning for the stabilizing forces of domestic partnership. Bridget, who seems more evolved in terms of understanding the often-arbitrary nature of human happiness, plucks a potential girlfriend for her sibling from the aisles of a local grocery store.

Chloe (Michelle Mary Schaefer – ASL, Sarah JK Shoemaker – Voice) has been dateless for some time, confiding that work, the occasional outing with friends, and the confines of her apartment don’t offer much opportunity to meet available men, emotionally or otherwise. When Bridget accosts Chloe at the market with a “crazy” plan to move her brother into the single woman’s place, creating an instant relationship, Chloe’s not as terrified as logic might suggest she ought to be.”

Read the full review on The Broadway Blog.